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RESULTSFound 1951 results for the word 'man' in all chess posts stored in the archive of yourchess.net since june 2008
 
 
IV Torneo Promocion (Almansa)
TORNEO A: PARA JUGADORES CON -2300 FIDE TORNEO B: PARA JUGADORES CON -2000 FIDE SISTEMA DE JUEGO (para los dos torneos) suizo a 9 rondas RITMO 90 minutos + 30” por jugada LUGAR DE JUEGO Hotel TRH Almansa INSCRIPCION: 25 € general Los dos torneos válidos para ELO FEDA y FIDE
 
http://ajedrezcastellon.com/torneos.html
Sabado,24 de Marzo 2009
 
 
 
Sergio Hernández se adjudica el Torneo de Semana Santa

Premiados del Torneo de Semana SantaEl jugador del Club Ajedrez Isla Bonita, Sergio Hernández León se adjudicó la sexta edición del Torneo de Semana Santa de Los Llanos de Aridane, tras hacer tablas en la última partida con Juan Manuel Acosta, a la postre cuarto clasificado.

El gran favorito del torneo, Gustavo de la Cruz, se tuvo que conformar con el subcampeonato, tras ser derrotado en la sexta ronda por Juan Manuel Acosta. La tercera plaza del abierto de Semana Santa, que se disputaba en La Casa de la Cultura de Argual, de los Llanos de Aridane, correspondía a Isaura Sanjuán.

En el Torneo, que se disputaba del 4 al 8 de abril pasados, congregaba a 26 jugadores de toda la isla, en un torneo que fue válido para la obtención de Elo internacional.

Destacar que el mejor veterano correspondía a Jacinto Iglesias, la mejor fémina Cristina Díaz, el mejor juvenil a Aitor Pińero, siendo los mejores jóvenes Daniel Guerra, Jacobo Martinez y Nayeli Capote en la categoría de infantiles, alevines y benjamines.

A la clausura del torneo acudía el Concejal de Deportes de Los Llanos de Aridane, José Juan Pérez, además de los responsables del Club Ajedrez Isla Bonita.

InformaciónResultados y clasificaciones completos en chessresults

Clasificación Final

Rank

SNo.

Nombre

Elo

FED

Pts

BUC

1

2

Hernandez Leon Sergio

2097

ESP

6

29

2

1

FM

De La Cruz Sanchez Carlos G

2289

ESP

32˝

3

3

Sanjuan Morigosa Isaura

1950

ESP

28

4

4

Acosta Sosa Juan Manuel

1923

ESP

5

28˝

5

13

Pinero Hernandez Aitor

1657

ESP

25˝

6

12

Diaz Leon Adelto

1690

ESP

24

7

6

Cruz Gomez Isidro

1818

ESP

4

30

8

5

Garcia Jorge Jose Luis

1844

ESP

4

30

9

9

Gonzalez Medina Toni

1717

ESP

4

26˝

10

8

Iglesias Dominguez Jacinto

1758

ESP

4

22˝

11

11

Gomez Daza Luis Jose

1705

ESP

4

22˝

12

18

Guerra Arrocha Daniel

1549

ESP

30

13

15

Lorenzo Ventura Abel

1590

ESP

27˝

14

10

Pinero Hernandez Atreyu

1711

ESP

26˝

15

24

Diaz Martin Cristina

0

ESP

24

16

7

Bolano Perez Manuel

1758

ESP

3

25

17

16

Rosso Pier Andrea

1589

ITA

3

24

18

25

Martinez Ramil Jacobo

0

ESP

3

23

19

23

Diaz Martin Carolina

0

ESP

3

22

20

17

Acosta Perez Juan Manuel

1567

ESP

3

21

21

22

Capote Robayna Nayeli

0

ESP

3

18˝

22

14

Acosta Martin Kevin

1647

ESP

19˝

23

20

Segura Leal Pablo

1207

ESP

2

24

24

26

Riverol Placencia Jorge

0

ESP

2

23

25

19

Zumbilez Atanas Cristoff

1407

BUL

2

22˝

26

21

Acosta Moreno Diego

0

ESP

1

19

 
http://ajedrezcanarias.com/2009/04/13/sergio-hernandez-se-adjudica-el-torneo-de-semana-santa/
Mon, 13 Apr 2009 20:00:03 +0000
 
 
 
2 queens too many
During the Doeberl Cup/SIO tournaments I witnessed 3 remarkable games that had one thing in common. They were Tindall v Toth from the Doeberl Cup Premier, Xie v Ghane (SIO) and Amrutha v Brown (SIO). In each case one player had 2 queens on the board, and remarkably, that player did not win the game. The only game where the 'stronger' side did not lose was the Xie Ghane game, but they may be attributed to the fact the Ghane had 2 extra rooks as well, giving him QQRR v QB for Xie. The other two games ended in wins for the 'weaker' side.
All three games can be found on the respective tournament websites (scroll down for posts containing the links), but here is the Amrutha v Brown game. The game had been 2R V Q for quite a while, and at various stages both sides could claim an advantage. Watching the game live I wasn't sure what was happening, but looking at it later I suspect that Brown especially played for a win, going so far as to risk losing on a number of occasions. This strategy finally paid off when Amrutha made a play for her second queen, not realising she had walked into a mate.

Amrutha,M (2155) - Brown,A (2085) [B33] Sydney International Open Parramatta, NSW (8.25), 18.04.2009

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e5 6.Ndb5 d6 7.Bg5 a6 8.Na3 b5 9.Bxf6 gxf6 10.Nd5 Bg7 11.Bd3 Ne7 12.Nxe7 Kxe7 13.0-0 d5 14.exd5 Qxd5 15.c4 bxc4 16.Nxc4 Rb8 17.Qe2 Qd4 18.Kh1 Be6 19.b3 f5 20.f3 e4 21.fxe4 fxe4 22.Bxe4 = 22...Qxa1 23.Rxa1 Bxa1 24.Na5 Rb5 25.Nc6+ Kf8 26.b4 Kg7 27.a4 Rg5 28.Qxa6 Re8 29.Qf1 Bc3 30.Qc1 Bf6 31.h3 Bxh3 32.gxh3 Rxe4 33.Qf1 Bc3 34.Qd3 Re1+ 35.Kh2 Bf6 36.b5 Ra1 37.Qe4 Ra2+ 38.Kh1 Rb2 39.Qf3 h5 40.Qe4 h4 41.Nd4 Rf2 42.Qd3 Kh8 43.b6 Rg3 44.Qe4 Rxh3+ 45.Kg1 Rb2 46.Nf5 Rg3+ 47.Nxg3 hxg3 48.b7 Kg7 49.Qg4+ Kf8 50.Qc8+ Kg7 51.b8Q (D)
51...Bd4+ 52.Kh1 Rh2# 0-1
 
http://chessexpress.blogspot.com/2009/04/2-queens-too-many.html
Mon, 20 Apr 2009 13:20:00 +0000
 
 
 
Nalchik R5: Solid preparation and human drama

Chess is a difficult game. Not only because you have to make good moves, but also because you have to stay alert for many hours. However hard you’ve worked before, one tiny lapse of concentration can destroy hours of labour. This sadly happened to Gata Kamsky in the fifth round of the Nalchik Grand Prix against Vladimir Akopian. Of course, all over the internet people immediately reacted as if they didn’t understand what had happened.

By Arne Moll

It’s very common these days: as soon as the blunder’s been made, people act as if it’s the weirdest thing in the world. Using lots of question marks and exclamation marks, they are quick to point out the correct path and show their incredulity. Of course, it’s especially easy to notice blunders when you’ve got an engine running in the background, but even without it, many chess fans on such moments seem to forget that grandmasters are still human, and that chess is still a human game.

The first to experience this was Vassily Ivanchuk. One of the pre-tournament favourites and definitely a favourite of the ChessVibes team, he just isn’t making the right moves in this tournament. I’m afraid there’s not much to say about the game. Playing a not too enterprising QGD with White, the Ukrainian badly blundered at move 22 against Rustam Kasimdzhanov, who finished him off within a few moves. Well, let’s look at things from the bright side: at least the former FIDE World Champion is getting properly into the tournament now, moving to zones in the ranking where he belongs.

As we’ve already noted in a recent issue of ChessVibes Openings, the German GM Jan Gustafsson plays an important role in modern day opening theory. In Nalchik, he’s Peter Leko’s second. No wonder, then, that Leko came excellently prepared against Alexander Grischuk in Gusti’s pet line, the always exciting Anti-Moscow Slav (once again showing, by the way, how untrue the stereotype is that Leko is a boring player!). To an outsider like me, all these games look pretty exciting - until you realize the guys have been following theory for 20 moves or so already. Not in this game, however, in which the Leko/Gusti team had apparently prepared a novelty at move 16 already. The move 16…c5 looked logical enough (even to me), and it led to a sharp position that seems not to have been out of balance, allowing Grischuk to hold on to his leading position in the tournament. I guess with hindsight it’s easy to dismiss such games as uninteresting, but that is a gross underestimation of the amount of work that has gone into it. In my opinion, deep opening preparation is always interesting, even if the result is sometimes ‘only’ a solid draw.

Gusti’s influence could also be felt in the game Alekseev-Aronian. In yet another Marshall Attack (also a speciality of Gusti’s), the players followed for some time the game Volokitin-Gustafsson from last year’s Bundesliga until Aronian deviated with the new move 16…Qf5!? instead of the usual Qh5. The idea of advancing the h-pawn to weaken g3 worked out excellently, and Aronian obtained an easy draw in the Marshall, as we’re used to by now.

Sergey Karjakin is working together with Kasparov’s ex-second Yuri Dokhoian and also came well prepared for his game against Shakhriyar Mamedyarov. In sharp Taimanov Sicilian, his move 8.Qg3!? was already new (previously, 8.Bf4 had been tried), and led to an optically very pleasant position. It’s not clear where Karjakin could have played better, because although his position looked extremely attractive despite having sacrificed his central e-pawn, Black defended excellently and comfortably cruised towards a draw. Sergey Shipov suggested 16.Ne4 (instead of 16.h4) as a natural way to gain advantage, and I think 15.Bf3 deserves attention as well. We’ll probably see this line again some time soon!

Speaking of Kasparov, the opening in the game between Etienne Bacrot and Pavel Eljanov (a Zaitsev Ruy Lopez) reminded one of the great fights between Kasparov and Karpov. Bacrot chose the now-topical 12.d5 and for a long time, the players the game Carlsen-Navara from last year’s FIDE Grand Prix in Baku. In this line, White wants to prove his bind on the white squares against Black’s pair of bishops. Bacrot sacrificed his e-pawn to gain total control over the white squares and the diagonal a2-g8 in particular, but somehow there wasn’t a forced win as Black got his game together just in time. Crazy sacs on f7 or h7 didn’t work out for White, and in the end Bacrot had to settle for a move repetition.

Peter Svidler faced an extremely sharp and no doubt home-prepared line against Boris Gelfand but achieved a shaky draw in the end. What started as a quiet Moscow Slav soon turned into a tactical position where Gelfand unleashed the spectacular 18…Bh3!? setting lots of practical problems for White. Svidler handled it in a principled, but very risky way, exposing his king and ruining his pawn structure. It seems Gelfand missed a couple of excellent chances in the double rook ending, but in the position was drawn anyway.

Akopian and Kamsky at the press conference

Akopian and Kamsky at the press conference

Gata Kamsky, on the other hand, couldn’t save his ending against Vladimir Akopian. Lovers of the French opening (a Tarrasch variation, to be precise) immediately recognized this as a classic and principled endgame in which Black trades some passivity and a minority on the queen’s side for an extra centre pawn and a rocky solid king’s side. Akopian handled the position with extreme skill, slowly gaining space and creating weaknesses in Black’s position. I especially liked his move 31.g4! restraining the black king’s side expansion. Black got stuck with a passive king and an roaming knight, and around move 50, Akopian could have gained a decisive advantage on several occasions.

However, he, too, wasn’t the sharpest chess player in the world anymore after such a tough game, and Kamsky managed to stay alive and even missed a study-like draw where a single Knight draws against Rook + Bishop. The game went on mercilessly and Akopian got a position where KBR+P vs. KR had to be won by sacrificing the last pawn. As a result, Akopian reached a theoretically won KRB vs. KR endgame, but according to the tablebase he misplayed it at several points. Of course, such an endgame is always difficult, especially after all previous emotions, and at move 93 he allowed a simple stalemate which Kamsky then… missed as well, losing in a few more moves after all.

Of course, the moment will be recorded in the cabinet of chess curiosities, but please let’s not be so surprised that this sort of thing happens in top tournaments as well. Anyone who’s ever had to defend (or win) this particular ending (at whatever level) knows how extremely exhausting a job this is, especially when the pressure has been so high in the previous hours. So, let’s applaud both Akopian and Kamksy for a marvellous and instructive game, reminding us once again that we’re all human and that that is precisely why we love the game of chess so much!

FIDE Grand Prix Nalchik 2009 | Round 5 Standings

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4    
1 Grischuk,A 2748 +124 *   ˝ ˝     1       ˝ 1     3.5/5  
2 Karjakin,S 2721 +73   * ˝ 1     ˝     ˝ ˝       3.0/5 7.75
3 Leko,P 2751 +41 ˝ ˝ *     ˝       ˝     1   3.0/5 7.50
4 Aronian,L 2754 +37 ˝ 0   * ˝         1     1   3.0/5 7.25
5 Alekseev,E 2716 +74       ˝ *   ˝   ˝   1 ˝     3.0/5 7.00
6 Kamsky,G 2720 +5     ˝     *   ˝ 1 ˝     0   2.5/5 6.25
7 Kasimdzhanov,R 2695 +30 0 ˝     ˝   *           ˝ 1 2.5/5 5.50
8 Bacrot,E 2728 -4           ˝   * ˝   ˝ ˝   ˝ 2.5/5 5.25
9 Svidler,P 2726 +2         ˝ 0   ˝ *     ˝   1 2.5/5 5.25
10 Mamedyarov,S 2725 -67   ˝ ˝ 0   ˝       *     ˝   2.0/5 5.25
11 Eljanov,P 2693 -31 ˝ ˝     0     ˝     *     ˝ 2.0/5 5.25
12 Gelfand,B 2733 -70 0       ˝     ˝ ˝     *   ˝ 2.0/5 4.75
13 Akopian,V 2696 -37     0 0   1 ˝     ˝     *   2.0/5 4.75
14 Ivanchuk,V 2746 -178             0 ˝ 0   ˝ ˝   * 1.5/5  


Videos

Links

 
http://www.chessvibes.com/reports/nalchik-r5-solid-preparation-and-human-drama/
Mon, 20 Apr 2009 13:35:25 +0000
 
 
 
Peralta, Naiditsch and Bachmann tie for first in Deizisau

Neckar winnersConcentrating on important tournaments during Easter, let’s move from the U.S. back to Europe, where from April 9 to 13 another strong tournament took place. The central location within Europe of Deizisau (Stuttgart area) attracted a lot of people from all over the world.

By IM Robert Ris

The international character of the tournament is probably best illustrated by the fact that 713 players from 29(!) different countries decided to play in Germany’s most popular Open. The tournament was divided into 3 rating categories, of which the A-group (1800 and higher) counted 358 players, including 19 GMs and 18 IMs, who had to fight out themselves who could take home the winners trophy and a respectable amount of 2250 euro (14.000 total prize fund). Enough proof to have a serious look at the games!

Top seed was Germany’s number one: 23-year-old Arkadij Naiditsch, who recently crossed the important 2700 barrier on the April rating list and currently occupies the 33rd spot in the world ranking. Being the absolute favourite gives you always some additional pressure. Already in the second round, the Latvian-born GM had to suffer from a horrible position against the 423 points lower-rated, Hartmut Metz. Naiditsch got luckily away with a draw when Metz showed too much respect, allowing Naiditsch to give a perpetual in a worse queen ending.

After five rounds, only Ukrainian GM Sergey Fedorchuk had still a 100% score, followed by a huge group 4˝’ers. Among them, GM Fernando Peralta who took over the lead by beating Fedorchuk with Black in a direct man-to-man fight. This crucial victory must have given the Argentinean GM a big boost, since in the next round he managed to grind down GM Alexander Graf in a nice attacking game.

There was a “funny” time-trouble game between Sergei Fedorchuk and Fernando Peralta. At the end Peralta had only one second for four moves and Fedorchuk 5-6 seconds and guess who won.

The only two players who were still in sight of Peralta were Naiditsch and the young Dutch IM Wouter Spoelman, who faced each other. Playing Black, Spoelman showed no fear and went for a sharp Najdorf in which Naiditsch couldn’t impress that much. After missing several wins (time trouble?!), Spoelman had to rest his case and defended the theoretically drawn Rook+Bishop against Rook ending correctly. Anyway, a nice performance by the Dutchman, who went on to make his second GM norm with a huge score of 7/9!

Another GM norm was made by Robin Swinkels. His black win over Graf in the eighth round made an important contribution to this fantastic result. Like Spoelman, he is on his way to become Dutch newest GM. Both guys have passed the 2500 mark already and it seems to be just a matter of time before they make the final norm!

The eighth round didn’t bring many decisive results on the top boards, so a relatively safe draw in the last round against the young Cuban GM Fidel Corrales guaranteed Peralta a well-deserved tournament victory. Despite the fact that in the end Naiditsch (winning against IM Pedersen) and Bachmann (defeating Swinkels and so recovering from his unnecessary third-round loss) collected the same number of points, Peralta was declared as official winner, having a better Buchholz than his rivals. With a Latin-American tandem and Germany’s no.1 finishing on stage, the tournament organisation can enthusiastically conclude that the 13th edition was definitely a successful one!

13th Neckar Open 2009 | Final Standings (top 40)

Pl. Name T Rtg Fed W D L Pts Buchh BuSumm
1. Peralta,Fernando GM 2559 ARG 6 3 0 7.5 54.0 446.5
2. Naiditsch,Arkadij GM 2700 GER 6 3 0 7.5 53.0 440.5
3. Bachmann,Axel GM 2555 PAR 7 1 1 7.5 49.5 429.0
4. Dziuba,Marcin GM 2535 POL 5 4 0 7.0 55.0 430.5
5. Spoelman,Wouter IM 2512 NED 5 4 0 7.0 53.5 426.0
6. Corrales Jimenez, GM 2574 CUB 6 2 1 7.0 53.0 423.0
7. Rusev,Krasimir GM 2498 BUL 6 2 1 7.0 51.5 440.5
8. Zaragatski,Ilja IM 2428 GER 5 4 0 7.0 51.0 449.0
9. Olszewski,Michal IM 2538 POL 6 2 1 7.0 51.0 417.5
10. Schneider,Ilja IM 2505 GER 5 4 0 7.0 51.0 415.5
11. Bindrich,Falko GM 2516 GER 6 2 1 7.0 50.0 422.5
12. Orzech,Dominik   2461 POL 6 2 1 7.0 49.0 424.5
13. Miedema,Roi FM 2370 NED 6 2 1 7.0 48.0 433.0
14. Fedorchuk,Sergey GM 2656 UKR 5 3 1 6.5 55.5 438.0
15. Swinkels,Robin IM 2499 NED 5 3 1 6.5 53.0 429.0
16. Klovans,Janis GM 2415 LAT 5 3 1 6.5 52.5 443.5
17. Boguslavskyy,Oleg   2415 GER 6 1 2 6.5 52.5 426.0
18. Gyimesi,Zoltan GM 2581 HUN 4 5 0 6.5 52.5 421.5
19. Milov,Leonid IM 2539 GER 6 1 2 6.5 52.0 414.0
20. Malakhatko,Vadim GM 2618 BEL 4 5 0 6.5 50.5 416.5
21. Lobzhanidze,Davit IM 2497 GEO 5 3 1 6.5 50.0 431.5
22. Farago,Ivan GM 2491 HUN 4 5 0 6.5 49.5 432.0
23. Berger,Steve FM 2413 GER 5 3 1 6.5 49.0 417.0
24. Hirneise,Tobias FM 2407 GER 6 1 2 6.5 47.5 417.5
25. Pedersen,Nicolai IM 2417 DEN 5 3 1 6.5 47.5 409.5
26. Fedorovsky,Michae   2432 GER 5 3 1 6.5 47.0 417.0
27. Gasthofer,Alexand IM 2441 GER 5 3 1 6.5 46.0 417.5
28. Thinius,Marco IM 2391 GER 6 1 2 6.5 45.5 414.0
29. Baramidze,David GM 2547 GER 6 1 2 6.5 44.0 399.0
30. Burg,Twan FM 2362 NED 5 2 2 6.0 55.0 433.5
31. Braun,Arik GM 2564 GER 4 4 1 6.0 55.0 421.0
32. Rau,Hannes IM 2425 GER 4 4 1 6.0 54.0 432.5
33. Schlosser,Philipp GM 2569 GER 4 4 1 6.0 53.5 438.5
34. Stark,Lars IM 2438 GER 4 4 1 6.0 51.0 394.0
35. Erdös,Viktor GM 2581 HUN 5 2 2 6.0 50.0 421.0
36. Becking,Stephan FM 2400 GER 6 0 3 6.0 50.0 412.5
37. Köpke,Christian FM 2364 GER 5 2 2 6.0 49.5 419.5
38. Ruijgrok,Dennis   2263 NED 4 4 1 6.0 49.0 427.5
39. Jorczik,Julian FM 2354 GER 5 2 2 6.0 49.0 394.5
40. Bogner,Sebastian IM 2511 GER 5 2 2 6.0 48.5 430.5


Finally, for more info I can really recommend you to have a look at the official tournament site, which was perfectly keeping up-to-date by IM Georgios Souleidis (who also took the picture above).

 
http://www.chessvibes.com/reports/peralta-naiditsch-and-bachmann-tie-for-first-in-deizisau/
Fri, 17 Apr 2009 15:29:28 +0000
 
 
 
La chronique échecs de Samir Adyel du Paris-Normandie
Le café est offert par Charly Founes, et la chronique échecs par Samir AdyelBonjour jolies lectrices et gentils lecteurs,
Nous vous offrons tout d'abord ce bon café turc de notre ami photographe Charly Founes, histoire de bien commencer la journée avec Chess & Strategy.
Ensuite, prenez le temps de lire la derničre chronique hebdomadaire d'échecs du journal Paris-Normandie, directement livrée ŕ domicile par Samir Adyel.
Au sommaire de cette chronique échecs éclectique : un mat en deux coups signé L. Boissy du Bulletin Ouvrier des Échecs de 1924, un joyau méconnu en provenance d'Uruguay, le problčme mathématique de la " rosace du cavalier ", une finale, une citation de François Le Lionnais et un pičge d'ouverture dans le Gambit Benkö. Fameux!
Merci Samir et bonne journée ŕ tous!
 
http://www.chess-and-strategy.com/2009/04/la-chronique-echecs-de-samir-adyel-du_16.html
Thu, 16 Apr 2009 05:00:00 +0000
 
 
 
Norman Stephenson's Opening Workshop #7
Read the latest opening secrets from the former British Senior Champion, over at:

http://www.chesslinksproject.btik.com/documents/1843372000.ikml

Miss the ammunition at your peril!
 
http://marshtowers.blogspot.com/2009/04/norman-stephensons-opening-workshop-7.html
Thu, 16 Apr 2009 18:37:00 +0000
 
 
 
Velden: Senioren Mannschafts EM
Russland gewinnt, Schweizer und Finnen mit am Podium -
Österreichs Senioren bei Heim-EM Sechster  
von F. Rulitz
In Velden ist am Ostermontag die 11. Europäische Senioren-Mannschaftsmeisterschaft im Schach – durchgeführt vom Kärntner Schachverband - mit dem Sieg Russlands zu Ende gegangen. Die russischen Senioren sind schon vor der Schlussrunde als Sieger festgestanden, haben nach dem 2,5:1,5- Sieg gegen Tschechien 17 Punkte von 18 möglichen eingeheimst. Um die Plätze 2 und 3 gab es im Casineum noch bis zuletzt ein Gerangel zwischen mehreren Mannschaften, darunter Österreich und Deutschland. Die beiden Nachbarn trafen in der 9. Runde aufeinander und trennten sich 2:2 unentschieden, was für beide Mannschaften einen Endstand von 13 Matchpunkten bedeutete. Die Schweiz mit Viktor Kortschnoi besiegte Dänemark mit 2,5:1,5 und wurde mit 14 Punkten Zweiter. Das Rennen um den verbleibenden Stockerlplatz wurde zwischen vier punktegleichen Mannschaften durch die Feinwertung entschieden – und da hatten die finnischen Senioren (3:1 gegen Leipzig) die Nase vorne, vor den Katalanen (3:1 gegen Italien), den Deutschen und den Österreichern. Das einzige Team, das dem Sieger Russland einen Punkt abknöpfen hatte können, kam somit nicht einmal unter die Top Fünf.

 
http://www.schach.com/component/content/article/1-schach/231-velden-senioren-mannschafts-em
Tue, 14 Apr 2009 05:49:04 +0000
 
 
 
Russland gewinnt Senioren-Europamannschaftsmeisterschaft
In Velden ist am Ostermontag die 11. Europäische Senioren-Mannschaftsmeisterschaft mit dem Sieg Russlands zu Ende gegangen. Am Ende holten sich die Spieler aus Russland mit 17 Punkten und drei Punkten Vorsprung den Titel. Silber ging an die Schweiz, die mit Viktor Kortschnoj den besten Spieler in ihren Reihen hatte. Bronze holte Finnland, u.a. mit Heikki Westerinen, dank besserer Zweitwertung vor Catalonien, Österreich und Deutschland. Die beiden letztgenannten Mannschaften trennten sich in der Schlussrunde remis, was keinem von beiden nutzte. Die überraschend starken Österreicher waren die einzigen, die der russischen Mannschaft in Runde 5 einen Punkt abnehmen konnten. Am Ende blieben sie zwar unglücklich ohne Medaille, rundeten damit aber das Bild von perfekten Gastgebern noch ab.
Turnierseite... Statistiken bei chess-results... Bericht, Bilder, Tabelle, Partien...
 
http://chessbase.de/nachrichten.asp?newsid=8880
Tue, 14 Apr 2009 00:00:00 GMT
 
 
 
A visit to Manchester College in Indiana


Here is a picture which was taken during my lecture at Manchester College in Indiana. Two of the key topics I touched on were Women's Chess and Chess for Peace. Standing next to me is Dr. Judd Case who formed the Chess Club at Manchester College. He's also the one who arranged for my visit at Manchester College.

Special thanks to Dr. Case and everyone else for your warm welcome and wonderful hospitality.

 
http://www.manchester.edu/OCA/PR/Files/News/SusanPolgar.htm
2009-04-14T09:31:00.002-05:00
 
 
 
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